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Knocking back the Stellas.... need more

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Geez , had to go waaay back to find this thread!  

Anyone bought that Aldi beer , Rivet?  Looking for another cheap decent beer !   St Etienne from Aldi is great at $30 a case! Rivet is even cheaper at $26 for a slab of cans!  

I don't want a tosspot description...." Oh it has underlying tones of citrus n honey with a smokey aftertaste"......blah blah fuucking blah...

just gimme a "it tastes great like such n such or crap like such n such" 

:meep:

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48 minutes ago, JackDoff said:

Geez , had to go waaay back to find this thread!  

Anyone bought that Aldi beer , Rivet?  Looking for another cheap decent beer !   St Etienne from Aldi is great at $30 a case! Rivet is even cheaper at $26 for a slab of cans!  

I don't want a tosspot description...." Oh it has underlying tones of citrus n honey with a smokey aftertaste"......blah blah fuucking blah...

just gimme a "it tastes great like such n such or crap like such n such" 

:meep:

I'm guessing it tastes like beer - so tastes crap. 

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45 minutes ago, Edinburgh said:

I'm guessing it tastes like beer - so tastes crap. 

Pops....

:nono:

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On 26 November 2017 at 2:05 PM, JackDoff said:

Geez , had to go waaay back to find this thread!  

Anyone bought that Aldi beer , Rivet?  Looking for another cheap decent beer !   St Etienne from Aldi is great at $30 a case! Rivet is even cheaper at $26 for a slab of cans!  

I don't want a tosspot description...." Oh it has underlying tones of citrus n honey with a smokey aftertaste"......blah blah fuucking blah...

just gimme a "it tastes great like such n such or crap like such n such" 

:meep:

How sad is this... reviewing my own post..  :nono:

ok , I went out n bought a case of Rivet .....$26 !!!   :woah:

not the greatest , but not the worst either 

has that " not much flavour to it " kinda taste .  Not a horrible after taste either , so for me , it's a fuuckin winner!!!  :drinks:

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Penrith represent (represent)

Jamieson represent (represent)

Colo represent (represen0

Blhe mountains pub crawl represent (represent)

:cool:

 

 

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i used to buy cans of JD, now i got one of those really big bottles, i used to have a rule only one can a day but now i have changed my rule to only one bottle a day

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Can only impart jewels of wisdom from my 56 years on planet earth, all started with a pint of Buckley's best bitter getting off the school bus at fourteen, graduated to double Diamond at sixteen in the local rugby club, then a steady influx of British regional beers such as Mcewans, Newcastle brown ale,Felinfoel,Greene king, whitbread, mackeson, youngers, Ben truman, etc.

The odd dalliance with Lagers in the summer months such as Carlsberg, Hoffmeister, Stella Artois,Heineken, etc, and due to day trip to Hereford races i am afraid i succumbed to Cider of the the strongbow variety, but discovered many other ciders of the scrumpie variety which left me with a blank of memory and soiled underpants i am ashamed to say, ah lectures from my late father "a gentleman knows how to handle his ale, if you feel below the weather always leave !" ,  good advice and a motto to live to your live your life by, wise words indeed (would have saved me many underpants as a young man if i heeded them earlier, and a few double bagger moments).

But i digress, i recently came across an old friend on the Dan Murphy website, all the way from Cardiff, ladies and gentlemen i give you Brains SA (special ale or skull attack depending on your slant) bloody lovely gear , get that down your funhole!

As per the Australian beers, i have sampled a damn good few, surprisingly enjoyed a west end beer in South Australia once,  but it was 40 plus and i was dry as a dead dingo's donger as they say , really enjoyed a castlemaine on a summer;s night in Llanelli, but i cannot go past a James squire Pale ale these days, out of a bottle mind, i do not know what gas pushes a beer through the tap and destroys all taste and flavour, but guys and girls Bottle is better than draught for taste all over the world, 100 %.

So whatever your tipple , as long as you enjoy it (and not soil your underpants) , just remember there is no such thing as a bad beer !, enjoy (responsibly of course).

 

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32 minutes ago, WSWJACK said:

Can only impart jewels of wisdom from my 56 years on planet earth, all started with a pint of Buckley's best bitter getting off the school bus at fourteen, graduated to double Diamond at sixteen in the local rugby club, then a steady influx of British regional beers such as Mcewans, Newcastle brown ale,Felinfoel,Greene king, whitbread, mackeson, youngers, Ben truman, etc.

The odd dalliance with Lagers in the summer months such as Carlsberg, Hoffmeister, Stella Artois,Heineken, etc, and due to day trip to Hereford races i am afraid i succumbed to Cider of the the strongbow variety, but discovered many other ciders of the scrumpie variety which left me with a blank of memory and soiled underpants i am ashamed to say, ah lectures from my late father "a gentleman knows how to handle his ale, if you feel below the weather always leave !" ,  good advice and a motto to live to your live your life by, wise words indeed (would have saved me many underpants as a young man if i heeded them earlier, and a few double bagger moments).

But i digress, i recently came across an old friend on the Dan Murphy website, all the way from Cardiff, ladies and gentlemen i give you Brains SA (special ale or skull attack depending on your slant) bloody lovely gear , get that down your funhole!

As per the Australian beers, i have sampled a damn good few, surprisingly enjoyed a west end beer in South Australia once,  but it was 40 plus and i was dry as a dead dingo's donger as they say , really enjoyed a castlemaine on a summer;s night in Llanelli, but i cannot go past a James squire Pale ale these days, out of a bottle mind, i do not know what gas pushes a beer through the tap and destroys all taste and flavour, but guys and girls Bottle is better than draught for taste all over the world, 100 %.

So whatever your tipple , as long as you enjoy it (and not soil your underpants) , just remember there is no such thing as a bad beer !, enjoy (responsibly of course).

 

 'Blastaways; a mix of diamond white cider and castaway an fruity alco drink we the first I had...very 1993 lol All in a pint glass, you would neck a  few of those before starting the lager and we started at 15, hiding in the corner of the pub among the crowd whilst someone who looked the oldest and could get served went up. Until one night they had a crack down and a ******* massive bouncer dragged us out, and kicked us through the door. Usually the pubs couldn't give a **** if you were under age, apart from when the police were sniffing around, like that time.

Edited by WSWBoro

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Scrumpy has done for me more than once. Feel fine, then you stand up. Or try to.

I dont remember what my first drink was  (goons not a bad bet), although now i do remember a tequila episode, but a long neck of old from the bottle-o on glebe pt rd and a naan from across the rd was a regular beginning to my weekends on a Saturday morning.

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17 hours ago, WSWBoro said:

 'Blastaways; a mix of diamond white cider and castaway an fruity alco drink we the first I had...very 1993 lol All in a pint glass, you would neck a  few of those before starting the lager and we started at 15, hiding in the corner of the pub among the crowd whilst someone who looked the oldest and could get served went up. Until one night they had a crack down and a ******* massive bouncer dragged us out, and kicked us through the door. Usually the pubs couldn't give a **** if you were under age, apart from when the police were sniffing around, like that time.

We had a similar one, Diamond white & Mad Dog or hooch, more memory blank and dead brain cells and waking up in bus stops wondering "how did i get here?"

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Another winner!!   :woah:

Butchers Bride Pale Ale from Aldi!!   $10 a 6pack!!!   :xnod:

:drinks:

 

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how did we let this drop off the first page? today is my first day of work for the dole but coincidentally i found out wild turkey is awesome with vanilla coke/pepsi 

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Hopefully you found that out last night!  

All the best for your day at work Goat!

:) :)

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On 12/07/2018 at 7:58 AM, wendybr said:

Hopefully you found that out last night!  

All the best for your day at work Goat!

:) :)

lol i forget when i found that out

When John Walker, born on 25 July 1805, lost his farmer father in 1819, the family sold the farm and their trustees invested the proceeds, £417, in an Italian warehouse, grocery, and wine and spirits shop on the High Street in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland. Walker managed the grocery, wine and spirits segment as a teenager in 1820. The Excise Act of 1823 relaxed strict laws on distillation of whisky and reduced, by a considerable amount, the extremely heavy taxes on the distillation and sale of whisky.[2] By 1825, Walker, a teetotaller, was selling spirits, including rum, brandy, gin and whisky.[3]

In short order, he switched to dealing mainly in whisky. Since blending of grain and malt whiskies was still banned, he was selling both blended malt whiskies and grain whiskies.[4] They were sold as made-to-order whiskies, blended to meet specific customer requirements, because he did not have any brand of his own.[5] He began using his name on labels years later, selling a blended malt as Walker's Kilmarnock Whisky. John Walker died in 1857.[3]

AlexanderWalker22.png
 
Alexander Walker, son of John Walker, inherited the business following his father's death.

The brand became popular, but after Walker's death it was his son Alexander ‘Alec’ Walker and grandson Alexander Walker II who were largely responsible for establishing the whisky as a favoured brand. The Spirits Act of 1860 legalised the blending of grain whiskies with malt whiskies and ushered in the modern era of blended Scotch whisky.[6][3] Andrew Usher of Edinburgh, Scotland, was the first to capitalise on blended Scotch whisky, a more accessible whisky that was lighter and sweeter in character, making it much more marketable to a wider audience,[7] followed by the Walkers in due course.

Alexander Walker had introduced the brand's signature square bottle in 1860. This meant more bottles fitting the same space and fewer broken bottles. The other identifying characteristic of the Johnnie Walker bottle was – and still is – the label, which, since that year, is applied at an angle of 24 degrees upwards left to right and allows text to be made larger and more visible.[8][3] This also allowed consumers to identify it at a distance.[9] One major factor in his favour was the arrival of a railway in Kilmarnock, carrying goods to merchant ships travelling the world. Thanks to Alec's business acumen, sales of Walker's Kilmarnock reached 100,000 gallons (450,000 litres) per year by 1862.[3]

In 1865, Alec created Johnnie Walker's first commercial blend and called it Old Highland Whisky, before registering it as such in 1867.[3][10]

Under John Walker, whisky sales represented eight percent of the firm's income; by the time Alexander was ready to pass on the company to his own sons, that figure had increased to between 90 and 95 percent.[11][12]

In 1893, Cardhu distillery was purchased by the Walkers to reinforce the stocks of one of the Johnnie Walker blends' key malt whiskies.[3] This move took the Cardhu single malt out of the market and made it the exclusive preserve of the Walkers.[13] Cardhu's output was to become the heart of the Old Highland Whisky and, subsequent to the rebranding of 1909, the prime single malt in Johnnie Walker Red and Black Labels.[9]

From 1906 to 1909, John's grandsons George and Alexander II expanded the line and had three blended whiskies in the market, Old Highland at 5 years old, Special Old Highland at 9 years old, and Extra Special Old Highland at 12 years old. These three brands had the standard Johnnie Walker labels, the only difference being their colour, White, Red and Black respectively; they were commonly being referred to in public by the colour of their labels.[9] In 1909, as part of a rebranding that saw the introduction of the Striding Man, a mascot used to the present day that was created by cartoonist Tom Browne,[14] the company re-branded their blends to match the common colour names. The Old Highland was renamed Johnnie Walker White Label,[15] and made a 6 year old, the Special Old Highland became Johnnie Walker Red Label at 10 years old, and Extra Special Old Highland was renamed Johnnie Walker Black Label remaining 12 years old.[3]

Sensing an opportunity for their brands in terms of expansion of scale and variety, The Walker company became a shareholder in Coleburn Distillery in 1915, quickly followed by Clynelish Distillery Co. and Dailuaine- Talisker Co. in 1916.[3] This ensured a steady supply of the output from the Cardhu, Coleburn, Clynelish, Talisker and Dailuaine distilleries.[16] In 1923, John Walker & Sons bought Mortlach distillery, in furtherance of their strategy.[17] Most of their output was used in Johnnie Walker blends, whose burgeoning popularity required increasingly vast volumes of single malts.

Johnnie Walker White was dropped during World War I.[18] In 1932, Alexander II added Johnnie Walker Swing to the line, the name originating from the unusual shape of the bottle, which allowed it to rock back and forth.

The company joined Distillers Company in 1925. Distillers Company was acquired by Guinness in 1986, and Guinness merged with Grand Metropolitan to form Diageo in 1997. That year saw the introduction of the blended malt, Johnnie Walker Pure Malt, renamed as Johnnie Walker Green Label in 2004.[19]

When the brand's owners, Diageo, announced its decision in 2009 to close all operations in the town of Kilmarnock, it met with backlash from local people, local politics and then First Minister of Scotland, Alex Salmond. Despite petitions, public campaigns and a large-scale march around Kilmarnock, Diageo continued to forge ahead with the closure.[20][21] The Johnnie Walker plant in Kilmarnock closed its doors in March 2012.[22]

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Beer slushies!!!!!        :woah:

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Slushies how's that a thing wtf :smurfnono:

 

Had a beer the other day for the first time in forever, Capital Brewing in Canberra - Summit XPA.

Tasted like it had passionfruit or pineapple or peaches in it, ****ed if I know what and it was only 3.5% 

Shame a carton is $95 at dan Murphy's imagine wanting to drink it regularly.

Edited by hawks2767

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1 hour ago, hawks2767 said:

Slushies how's that a thing wtf :smurfnono:

 

Had a beer the other day for the first time in forever, Capital Brewing in Canberra - Summit XPA.

Tasted like it had passionfruit or pineapple or peaches in it, ****ed if I know what and it was only 3.5% 

Shame a carton is $95 at dan Murphy's imagine wanting to drink it regularly.

Had a can in the freezer just a tad too long, slushies !!!

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i actually had one glass of baileys(small glass) recently i am a tiny bit allergic but there isnt that much dairy so i was pretty safe, i expected something pretty smooth but holy hell it was far to strong for me

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this isnt specifically about alcohol but its interesting to see how different alcohol types advertise, whiskey is usually advertised as traditional and gentlemanly, beer usually just makes fun of people who drink beer :P

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7 hours ago, GlobalWarning said:

this isnt specifically about alcohol but its interesting to see how different alcohol types advertise, whiskey is usually advertised as traditional and gentlemanly, beer usually just makes fun of people who drink beer :P

 

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Shut up and take my MONEY!

So glad that this is finally out. Really recommend Kraken Rum to any rum fan. 

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Been going through a bottle of kraken. It's not bad. No diplomatico though.

Interesting they're putting out the mixer.... 

I did try it out of interest with

Coke

Ginger 

Scrumpy

And they all went good, but it always feels like a bit of a waste to me.

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On 20/02/2020 at 9:14 AM, marron said:

Been going through a bottle of kraken. It's not bad. No diplomatico though.

Interesting they're putting out the mixer.... 

I did try it out of interest with

Coke

Ginger 

Scrumpy

And they all went good, but it always feels like a bit of a waste to me.

I do enjoy Kraken and Coke. 
I had a look at prices and it's $27.00 for a 4 pack.
I say that's OKish...

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