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Thank you Malone, I'll have to... steal your idea :P

 

 

Do we have any referees here?

 

I started refereeing at a park football level just last year and I'm really enjoying it - watching A-League just makes me feel very annoyed that I won't be able to go out there myself until April! But yeah, it'd be nice to hear from other referees because with all the abuse we get from players/coaches/parents, I don't think there's very many of us!

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Can't stand the SDSFA refs, bunch of noobs!

 

I want a yellow and red card though, they seem cool to have :)

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Yep... well former referee/assistant referee/fourthy... from SSRA, then the NSWPL, then the NYL with a small sprinkling of HAL matches :)

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I referee rugby league. Not that anyone cares here! But if it's worth it, I'm stepping down from with the whistle to play 11v11 Football for the first time. I've been part of rugby league for over 22 years, so coming across to the round ball game is all part of my experience of following the Wanderers and understanding Football better.

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I referee rugby league. Not that anyone cares here! But if it's worth it, I'm stepping down from with the whistle to play 11v11 Football for the first time. I've been part of rugby league for over 22 years, so coming across to the round ball game is all part of my experience of following the Wanderers and understanding Football better.

Good luck!

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I would love to ref. Just I don't think I would be allowed to because all of the crazy people. White line fever I think 80% of ragers are nice people they just get mad on the field (me). Get money to watch football, keeps you fit. Do they provide a whistle or do you buy one

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I would love to ref. Just I don't think I would be allowed to because all of the crazy people. White line fever I think 80% of ragers are nice people they just get mad on the field (me). Get money to watch football, keeps you fit. Do they provide a whistle or do you buy one

It all depends on the level that you ref and whether you put into it or not. Most problems that I see is when it's all age division 10 or something and the ref just doesn't care, he's just there for the money. The players can pick up on it straight away and then that's where problems start. The higher levels that you go generally the more professional the players and coaches are, but then you have to lift your level of performance otherwise you just get crushed.

 

I had to buy my own whistles, I have 8 of them, many different colours lol

And a FNSW coin

20tqef8.jpg

Edited by Nnnnnathan12

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Can someone explain the ins and outs of Throw Ins for me? I've done two foul throws in trial matches so far, need a bit of rules and interpretations background.

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Can someone explain the ins and outs of Throw Ins for me? I've done two foul throws in trial matches so far, need a bit of rules and interpretations background.

 

Tip: Dont be crap!

 

LOL, in all seriousness this is probably the best place to ask it ;)

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Yep... well former referee/assistant referee/fourthy... from SSRA, then the NSWPL, then the NYL with a small sprinkling of HAL matches :)

 

 

I ref football, highest level I've officiated is U16 NSWPL and I've been to a few state titles which is heaps of fun :P

 

Wow, how was that experience? Good? As someone who's still stuck in the mire of park football... how does one... progress in level? Like I enjoy refereeing itself, I think it's being paid to exercise, and as much as I like the easy money walking for 30 minutes in under 12s games, I'd like to have more challenging stuff!

 

 

Can someone explain the ins and outs of Throw Ins for me? I've done two foul throws in trial matches so far, need a bit of rules and interpretations background.

 

Did you ask why it was a foul throw? I gave a few last season for people overstepping the line, or with both feet not on the ground...

 

---

 

And AEK, yes, having the cards is pretty cool!

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Can someone explain the ins and outs of Throw Ins for me? I've done two foul throws in trial matches so far, need a bit of rules and interpretations background.

Hey mate, I'm not a ref but this page may help. http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/footballdevelopment/technicalsupport/refereeing/laws-of-the-game/law/newsid=1290875.html

 

Procedure

At the moment of delivering the ball, the thrower:

  • faces the field of play
  • has part of each foot either on the touch line or on the ground outside the touch line
  • holds the ball with both hands
  • delivers the ball from behind and over his head
  • delivers the ball from the point where it left the field of play

All opponents must stand no less than 2 m (2 yds) from the point at which the throw-in is taken.

The ball is in play when it enters the field of play.

After delivering the ball, the thrower must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player.

Edited by Carns

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I'm getting done for stuff like the ball not being fully behind head before throw or changing direction during throw.

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I'm getting done for stuff like the ball not being fully behind head before throw or changing direction during throw.

Changing the direction while you are throwing is a feed of crap, where in those five points above does it say that you can't twist when you throw the ball? The amount if refs that seem to think that it's a foul throw is ridiculous.

 

Also the other thing with throw ins is when they throw the ball in and it goes straight to ground, if the ball was behind their head then what's the problem? Some people have this imaginary rule in their head where if it's a throw in and it bounces 2m away from them it's somehow a foul throw.

 

It's a bloody throw in, just get on with the game lol

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I ref football, highest level I've officiated is U16 NSWPL and I've been to a few state titles which is heaps of fun :P

 

 

Wow, how was that experience? Good? As someone who's still stuck in the mire of park football... how does one... progress in level? Like I enjoy refereeing itself, I think it's being paid to exercise, and as much as I like the easy money walking for 30 minutes in under 12s games, I'd like to have more challenging stuff!

The pace of the game is incredible compared to park football, and a lot of the clubs now have the new artificial turf which makes it faster. Also one thing that I notice is that the challenges are very tough and physical but they manage to stay up, but when the kids get to the a-league they seem fall like a sack of potatoes, it must be a thing that their taught by their coaches to never dive, which is a good thing to teach the younger fellas, only problem is that it doesn't seem to translate to the professional game.

 

Basically you just get there through your local association, if you're under 25 then you'll have a much higher chance of getting there because you'll get 'pushed' through. If you're older then get up to refereeing the highest level in the association and show a lot of interest in progressing to state league

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Yep... well former referee/assistant referee/fourthy... from SSRA, then the NSWPL, then the NYL with a small sprinkling of HAL matches :)

 

 

I ref football, highest level I've officiated is U16 NSWPL and I've been to a few state titles which is heaps of fun :P

 

Wow, how was that experience? Good? As someone who's still stuck in the mire of park football... how does one... progress in level? Like I enjoy refereeing itself, I think it's being paid to exercise, and as much as I like the easy money walking for 30 minutes in under 12s games, I'd like to have more challenging stuff!

 

 

Was both good and bad. At the HAL/NYL level the money was good, but the level of commitment they expected (for example, game started at 3 and in Newcastle say, I'd have to get there an hour and half before, allow 2.5 hours to get there, and be there nearly an hour after the game) and tried to fit into work was near impossible - and with getting married and wanting to focus on a career and my family I stepped aside - plus there was A LOT of politics going on, I would rather take my time and get through on talent than sucking up, ass-kissing and giving out free games of golf to the higher ups (someone I know on the HAL at the moment did that to get to where they are).

 

When I first started in the state leagues it was really tough - getting used to the different cultures and ethnicity (I had originally refereed in the mono-ethnic leagues of the Sutherland Shire) was really tough. I'd been spat at, racially abused and been to judiciary too many times to count (mostly to confirm my submitted reports), but I got through it and then moved onto bigger and better things.

 

Doing the NYL was great, especially when they were mainly as curtain-raisers when it started. Seemed like Bluetongue was a home-away-from-home most weekends. I met lots of great people, Lawrie McKinna was/is a top bloke, he was the 1st team coach at Hills United when I was in one of the youth sides (Kris Griffiths-Jones, ironically was his keeper at the time), I met Ange a few times too (doing games for the Joeys, from memory Mooy was in that side years ago, playing at Cromer Park) and had a good long chat with Steve Corica before a HAL trial at Leichhardt Oval (when the lights wouldn't come on).

 

It's a very different world from grassroots to the top leagues though, but I saw it all from the ground up, so I suppose it gives me a great appreciation for the game from different aspects. I'm now looking forward to starting my coaching career - at the ground level - just with the local amateur club (under 12's).

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The pace of the game is incredible compared to park football, and a lot of the clubs now have the new artificial turf which makes it faster. Also one thing that I notice is that the challenges are very tough and physical but they manage to stay up, but when the kids get to the a-league they seem fall like a sack of potatoes, it must be a thing that their taught by their coaches to never dive, which is a good thing to teach the younger fellas, only problem is that it doesn't seem to translate to the professional game.

 

Basically you just get there through your local association, if you're under 25 then you'll have a much higher chance of getting there because you'll get 'pushed' through. If you're older then get up to refereeing the highest level in the association and show a lot of interest in progressing to state league

 

 

 

Was both good and bad. At the HAL/NYL level the money was good, but the level of commitment they expected (for example, game started at 3 and in Newcastle say, I'd have to get there an hour and half before, allow 2.5 hours to get there, and be there nearly an hour after the game) and tried to fit into work was near impossible - and with getting married and wanting to focus on a career and my family I stepped aside - plus there was A LOT of politics going on, I would rather take my time and get through on talent than sucking up, ass-kissing and giving out free games of golf to the higher ups (someone I know on the HAL at the moment did that to get to where they are).

 

When I first started in the state leagues it was really tough - getting used to the different cultures and ethnicity (I had originally refereed in the mono-ethnic leagues of the Sutherland Shire) was really tough. I'd been spat at, racially abused and been to judiciary too many times to count (mostly to confirm my submitted reports), but I got through it and then moved onto bigger and better things.

 

Doing the NYL was great, especially when they were mainly as curtain-raisers when it started. Seemed like Bluetongue was a home-away-from-home most weekends. I met lots of great people, Lawrie McKinna was/is a top bloke, he was the 1st team coach at Hills United when I was in one of the youth sides (Kris Griffiths-Jones, ironically was his keeper at the time), I met Ange a few times too (doing games for the Joeys, from memory Mooy was in that side years ago, playing at Cromer Park) and had a good long chat with Steve Corica before a HAL trial at Leichhardt Oval (when the lights wouldn't come on).

 

It's a very different world from grassroots to the top leagues though, but I saw it all from the ground up, so I suppose it gives me a great appreciation for the game from different aspects. I'm now looking forward to starting my coaching career - at the ground level - just with the local amateur club (under 12's).

 

 

Wow... I think overall these stories both sound awesome - better than say, under 12s where everyone is scared to make a tackle! And Gazmon, that's pretty frigging cool that you got to meet Ange.

 

Well, I am under 25 so... let's see where I can go with this shindig :P

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If your association has training, then turn up to training, know the law book back to front and just show general enthusiasm then you should progress higher. Politics do play a role in every sport, so getting onside with the right people, branch coach, the appointments officer, the president etc.. Will likely help your chances.

 

Wow gazmon you've met some pretty interesting people, can't say that I've met people at the same level lol,

Refereed Alusine Fofanah at U14 state titles a couple of years ago, he had so much pace and talent compared to everyone else, you could tell that he already had 'it' to be a professional footballer.

There was another kid called Matt Stewart, I've seen him on the wanderers NYL teamsheet that they tweet out every so often, he was the best player by far at that tournament, he just had so much skill compared to everyone else, incredible vision and touch on the ball, definitely someone to watch out for.

Edited by Nnnnnathan12

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If your association has training, then turn up to training, know the law book back to front and just show general enthusiasm then you should progress higher. Politics do play a role in every sport, so getting onside with the right people, branch coach, the appointments officer, the president etc.. Will likely help your chances.

 

Wow gazmon you've met some pretty interesting people, can't say that I've met people at the same level lol,

Refereed Alusine Fofanah at U14 state titles a couple of years ago, he had so much pace and talent compared to everyone else, you could tell that he already had 'it' to be a professional footballer.

There was another kid called Matt Stewart, I've seen him on the wanderers NYL teamsheet that they tweet out every so often, he was the best player by far at that tournament, he just had so much skill compared to everyone else, incredible vision and touch on the ball, definitely someone to watch out for.

 

Haha thanks guys.

 

I've had my fair share of crap in the state leagues (the lower down it was the worse it was) but I got through that, learned a lot, then moved on up.

 

I've had some epic sprays from Phil Moss back in his Manly FC days when I was up at Cromer, but after the game he was pretty cool about it. The worse spray from a HAL coach/manager was Mehmet Durakovic (spelling?) when he was with the Victory youth playing the Mariners up in the bush at Tuggerah somewhere, he just went off while I was fourth official, can't remember what about, I just remember the craziness of it all.

 

The people though that make the clubs tick are the volunteers on the day and the liaison officers, they have to deal with demanding TV crews (oh, was great perving on Mel M when she used to wander down the tunnel at Bluetongue), deal with demanding teams and then help the referees out (gotta love free sandwiches and Gatorade), they usually were run off their feet and loved every minute of it.

 

It's still odd watching KGJ ref at the moment, my dad was one of his mentors and he referee's just like him - it's scary - I was more of a seen and not heard referee, but spent most time doing lines and fourthies.

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If your association has training, then turn up to training, know the law book back to front and just show general enthusiasm then you should progress higher. Politics do play a role in every sport, so getting onside with the right people, branch coach, the appointments officer, the president etc.. Will likely help your chances.

 

Getting onside with the right people :rofl:

 

Good advice!

 

 

If your association has training, then turn up to training, know the law book back to front and just show general enthusiasm then you should progress higher. Politics do play a role in every sport, so getting onside with the right people, branch coach, the appointments officer, the president etc.. Will likely help your chances.

 

Wow gazmon you've met some pretty interesting people, can't say that I've met people at the same level lol,

Refereed Alusine Fofanah at U14 state titles a couple of years ago, he had so much pace and talent compared to everyone else, you could tell that he already had 'it' to be a professional footballer.

There was another kid called Matt Stewart, I've seen him on the wanderers NYL teamsheet that they tweet out every so often, he was the best player by far at that tournament, he just had so much skill compared to everyone else, incredible vision and touch on the ball, definitely someone to watch out for.

 

Haha thanks guys.

 

I've had my fair share of crap in the state leagues (the lower down it was the worse it was) but I got through that, learned a lot, then moved on up.

 

I've had some epic sprays from Phil Moss back in his Manly FC days when I was up at Cromer, but after the game he was pretty cool about it. The worse spray from a HAL coach/manager was Mehmet Durakovic (spelling?) when he was with the Victory youth playing the Mariners up in the bush at Tuggerah somewhere, he just went off while I was fourth official, can't remember what about, I just remember the craziness of it all.

 

The people though that make the clubs tick are the volunteers on the day and the liaison officers, they have to deal with demanding TV crews (oh, was great perving on Mel M when she used to wander down the tunnel at Bluetongue), deal with demanding teams and then help the referees out (gotta love free sandwiches and Gatorade), they usually were run off their feet and loved every minute of it.

 

It's still odd watching KGJ ref at the moment, my dad was one of his mentors and he referee's just like him - it's scary - I was more of a seen and not heard referee, but spent most time doing lines and fourthies.

 

 

You make it sound as if refereeing at that level is like the prime place to see the stars and coaches of the future!

 

But on actual thought... it kinda is.

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If your association has training, then turn up to training, know the law book back to front and just show general enthusiasm then you should progress higher. Politics do play a role in every sport, so getting onside with the right people, branch coach, the appointments officer, the president etc.. Will likely help your chances.

 

Getting onside with the right people :rofl:

 

Good advice!

 

 

If your association has training, then turn up to training, know the law book back to front and just show general enthusiasm then you should progress higher. Politics do play a role in every sport, so getting onside with the right people, branch coach, the appointments officer, the president etc.. Will likely help your chances.

 

Wow gazmon you've met some pretty interesting people, can't say that I've met people at the same level lol,

Refereed Alusine Fofanah at U14 state titles a couple of years ago, he had so much pace and talent compared to everyone else, you could tell that he already had 'it' to be a professional footballer.

There was another kid called Matt Stewart, I've seen him on the wanderers NYL teamsheet that they tweet out every so often, he was the best player by far at that tournament, he just had so much skill compared to everyone else, incredible vision and touch on the ball, definitely someone to watch out for.

 

Haha thanks guys.

 

I've had my fair share of crap in the state leagues (the lower down it was the worse it was) but I got through that, learned a lot, then moved on up.

 

I've had some epic sprays from Phil Moss back in his Manly FC days when I was up at Cromer, but after the game he was pretty cool about it. The worse spray from a HAL coach/manager was Mehmet Durakovic (spelling?) when he was with the Victory youth playing the Mariners up in the bush at Tuggerah somewhere, he just went off while I was fourth official, can't remember what about, I just remember the craziness of it all.

 

The people though that make the clubs tick are the volunteers on the day and the liaison officers, they have to deal with demanding TV crews (oh, was great perving on Mel M when she used to wander down the tunnel at Bluetongue), deal with demanding teams and then help the referees out (gotta love free sandwiches and Gatorade), they usually were run off their feet and loved every minute of it.

 

It's still odd watching KGJ ref at the moment, my dad was one of his mentors and he referee's just like him - it's scary - I was more of a seen and not heard referee, but spent most time doing lines and fourthies.

 

 

You make it sound as if refereeing at that level is like the prime place to see the stars and coaches of the future!

 

But on actual thought... it kinda is.

 

 

I remember doing Scott Jamieson's last game at Blacktown before he went overseas, the club tried to make a big deal about it but everyone was like 'meh'.

 

I guess, looking back, I had some really good experiences. But, I start coaching this week (first training on Tuesday), so maybe I can work back up to a top level again - would be nice - but, I'm not expecting anything, just want to put something back into the game I've loved since I was 4.

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i'm never offside btw, all you guys are wrong.

Yeah, okay Mifsud...

 

 

 

who? never heard of him.

 

who does he play for now?

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http://www.a-league.com.au/article/ffa-to-appoint-professional-hyundai-a-league-referees/1kb1deuehy27i1tbis7k9e32q8

 

 

 


The Hyundai A-League has taken a significant step forward with Football Federation Australia (FFA) today announcing the appointment of three full time professional referees from the start of the 2015/16 Season.

The move to introduce full time professional referees for the first time in Australian domestic football history is another natural progression in the development of the Hyundai A-League, which is now well and truly embedded in the Australian sporting landscape.

The establishment of this professional referees program now provides a clear career pathway from the grassroots to the very top of the game which was outlined in the Whole of Football Plan released last month.

Players, clubs, media, fans and the referees themselves have been calling for full time referees over recent years to allow officials more time to prepare mentally and physically for the demands of the Hyundai A-League.

Head of Hyundai A-League, Damien de Bohun, was thrilled with the announcement that full-time referees would officiate in the Hyundai A-League for the 2015/16 Season.

“The Hyundai A-League is a professional competition and the last frontier has been the appointment of professional referees,†de Bohun said.

“We have been working towards this outcome for the past three years and we are proud to announce that we are able to appoint our first professional referees for the upcoming Hyundai A-League season.

“I must give credit to Ben Wilson, our Director of Referees, who has worked hard to improve the conditions and  professionalism of our all our matches officials.

“The concept of professional referees has been warmly welcomed by the Hyundai A-League club chairmen when they were formally advised last week.

“By having our best referees become full-time professionals, we will be giving them every opportunity to prepare themselves physically and mentally for each match so they can perform at their optimum level each week.â€

FFA Director of Referees Ben Wilson was equally pleased to see the introduction of professional referees this season.

“This initiative will allow our referees to achieve a better work/life balance and hopefully extend their careers,†Wilson said. “We hope to provide the perfect conditions for referees to officiate to their maximum potential.

“This is the first step in the process with our goal being to have a fully professional referee panel in the future and gives young referees a real career path.â€

Initially, the three referees will each be offered two-year contracts and in addition to professional refereeing, would participate in a referee well-being program which has been established to enhance the development and welfare of all Hyundai A-League and Westfield W-League match officials.

FFA will go through a recruitment process and will be encouraging all interested referees to apply. Applications opened yesterday and close on 3 July. The successful candidates will be announced in mid-July.

The referees will meet regularly at the Referee Headquarters at the FFA’s Centre of Excellence which is located at the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra.

Read more at http://www.a-league.com.au/article/ffa-to-appoint-professional-hyundai-a-league-referees/1kb1deuehy27i1tbis7k9e32q8#CTJqJMDzsViblv2E.99
 

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Better than nothing, will be interested to see who is picked and how they perform. 2 of the games refs and all the assistants will still be amateur.

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As if making officials full time will make them much, much better

 

They're still the same people...

 

 

Sure, they'll most likely be marginally better, perhaps a little bit better, but if people think, "OMG now zero mistakes in any game", they're in for a bad time

 

I'll give it four or five weeks into the season before we start seeing whinging about the full time referees being crap and how the hell they were selected and it's a massive farce, etc.

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:shok:

 

Thought we'd have to wait till the new TV deal but not sure whether this is going to make huge improvements. Better grab nothing I guess!

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