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mack

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i just got a confusing email, the header says my vocal lesson has been scheduled which is fantastic since i dont sing and dont have any vocal lessons but hell a free lesson and then i click on it and apparently she lives in my neighborhood and wants me to nail her later........(her words)

then it gives me a link to a viru.......i mean video which i am not going to click on :P

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I'll put this here to leave the  other thread to more serious discussion.

Poor "Jonathan" is in self isolation

A different slice of Pie...poignant rather than funny.

 

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And one more...with a ring of many truths to it.

 

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24 minutes ago, mack said:

He's got awful cable management.

Hahaha! 

Whatever....

All part of the persona.

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10 hours ago, mack said:

He's got awful cable management.

Typical IT ............ !!!

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On 27/03/2020 at 1:34 PM, HollowedHeart said:

kinda about video games but more about creepy merchandise :P
 

 

another one of these because why not
 

 

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To others here working from home....how are you finding it?

Sure, not having to drive etc is good.

But I found it unrelenting, and even though, on a normal day, I get little time to sit around and chat, I missed the social interactions.

I could hardly bring myself to sit at the computer yesterday, so exhausted was I by working there all last week.

 I'm used to having to bring work home, but it kind of brings work right into your home in a profound way.

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5 minutes ago, wendybr said:

To others here working from home....how are you finding it?

Sure, not having to drive etc is good.

But I found it unrelenting, and even though, on a normal day, I get little time to sit around and chat, I missed the social interactions.

I could hardly bring myself to sit at the computer yesterday, so exhausted was I by working there all last week.

 I'm used to having to bring work home, but it kind of brings work right into your home in a profound way.

I think it’s pretty good!

As it stands now I can get up from bed at 8.40 and be “on time” for work.

The way I see it, working from home retrieves 3 hours of my day I spend commuting.

For the social aspect, we have been assigned to teams which catch up daily by video link just to keep us connected and talking to someone daily. 

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18 minutes ago, Unlimited said:

I think it’s pretty good!

As it stands now I can get up from bed at 8.40 and be “on time” for work.

The way I see it, working from home retrieves 3 hours of my day I spend commuting.

 

Makes total sense - I'm so lucky and normally only have a 10 - 15 min drive to work....although with 2 two year periods of road work on the M2, it became 40mins!

But I can see that would be a huge plus.

Quote

For the social aspect, we have been assigned to teams which catch up daily by video link just to keep us connected and talking to someone daily. 

I'm doing that too, and in "Classrooms" - all day - some days til 10pm lol.

I miss the kids.:(

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49 minutes ago, wendybr said:

To others here working from home....how are you finding it?

Sure, not having to drive etc is good.

But I found it unrelenting, and even though, on a normal day, I get little time to sit around and chat, I missed the social interactions.

I could hardly bring myself to sit at the computer yesterday, so exhausted was I by working there all last week.

 I'm used to having to bring work home, but it kind of brings work right into your home in a profound way.

It's easy to find, I live there!

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34 minutes ago, wendybr said:

To others here working from home....how are you finding it?

Sure, not having to drive etc is good.

But I found it unrelenting, and even though, on a normal day, I get little time to sit around and chat, I missed the social interactions.

I could hardly bring myself to sit at the computer yesterday, so exhausted was I by working there all last week.

 I'm used to having to bring work home, but it kind of brings work right into your home in a profound way.

Very good

Not having to commute an hour on the train (and saving Opal card money)

Avoiding snacking by eating proper breakfasts and lunch

Can listen to ABC Jazz or Double J without using headphones

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7 minutes ago, marron said:

I need a podcast for my trip to work. Any reccomendations? 1 minute long would be ideal. 2, tops.

Seyi Adeleke's career highlights at Western Sydney Wanderers, but I'm not sure it would be long enough.

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2 hours ago, wendybr said:

To others here working from home....how are you finding it?

Sure, not having to drive etc is good.

But I found it unrelenting, and even though, on a normal day, I get little time to sit around and chat, I missed the social interactions.

I could hardly bring myself to sit at the computer yesterday, so exhausted was I by working there all last week.

 I'm used to having to bring work home, but it kind of brings work right into your home in a profound way.

I've worked from home the last 6 years. I can understand the social isolation when you are used to being surrounded by hundreds of people a day. I make a point of talking to my colleagues regularly (both work and non work related) to maintain a connection.

Another thing I do is have separate spaces for my work and living. For me, I set myself up for work in the dining room, and don't spend much time in that space outside of work hours (easier with a laptop rather than a desktop). My partner sets herself up in our office and she does the same. I find it easier to have a dedicated working space that I can leave at the end of the day and not return to/think about.

I do find it difficult at times switching off when I work from home (can respond to emails at all times of the day and night) but I make a point of trying to avoid that outside of business hours (where practical), and definitely don't look at my work phone or open my emails after Friday afternoon until Monday morning.

For me the benefits outweigh any negatives, but you have to take the time to maintain relationships whilst locked at home. I have worked with people who couldn't handle it because they need the social interaction. Which is why I make a point of maintaining connections with people.

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Yep I think that seperation of space is really important.

I don't know how your school is operating Wendy but I'd also suggest trying to keep to timetable and routines and stuff. LIke, even if you are just setting work for the day/week - if you have year 9 on friday last period (like, that's how it works, isn't it, always), make that the time that you actually check in and mark their work or whatever.

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2 hours ago, Unlimited said:

I think it’s pretty good!

As it stands now I can get up from bed at 8.40 and be “on time” for work.

Taking the positives out of things, this is good :) 

Personally I am struggling at home with stay in your home period we are in. I have been practicing social isolation now for about 10 years :lol: but that has been more out of necessity rather than by choice. In fact, if all the times I’ve been stuck at home, not getting out & reducing my activity I’ve found myself get stuck in a vicious circle where doing less breeds more stagnation & getting stuck in that rut which isn’t good for a migraine brain.

Oh well, let’s hope some more positive news :good:

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51 minutes ago, marron said:

Yep I think that separation of space is really important.

I don't know how your school is operating Wendy but I'd also suggest trying to keep to timetable and routines and stuff. LIke, even if you are just setting work for the day/week - if you have year 9 on friday last period (like, that's how it works, isn't it, always), make that the time that you actually check in and mark their work or whatever.

Good thinking, but it's a bit different for me.

Only got 2 senior EAL/D classes, but support others across the school, and have a high level welfare and admin role for our International kids (as Int Student Coordinator).

Currently trying to arrange all the stuff required for the immediate enrolment of 2 more Internationals, as well as talking to some kids who have retreated back home to China temporarily, but who are still enrolled and working on Google Classrooms.

Good times! as the kids say...but I'm still in my PJs...having been at it solidly since 8.15, which is when we start.

I'm not bored tho! :lol:

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36 minutes ago, Prydzopolis said:

Taking the positives out of things, this is good :) 

Personally I am struggling at home with stay in your home period we are in. I have been practicing social isolation now for about 10 years :lol: but that has been more out of necessity rather than by choice. In fact, if all the times I’ve been stuck at home, not getting out & reducing my activity I’ve found myself get stuck in a vicious circle where doing less breeds more stagnation & getting stuck in that rut which isn’t good for a migraine brain.

Oh well, let’s hope some more positive news :good:

Take care Prydz!

:grouphug:

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3 hours ago, wendybr said:

To others here working from home....how are you finding it?

Sure, not having to drive etc is good.

But I found it unrelenting, and even though, on a normal day, I get little time to sit around and chat, I missed the social interactions.

I could hardly bring myself to sit at the computer yesterday, so exhausted was I by working there all last week.

 I'm used to having to bring work home, but it kind of brings work right into your home in a profound way.

You're not wrong.

I work at home all the time, maybe a day a week normally. I can sleep in and still get  to work before i would normally if I had to get the train. I have breakfast with the kids, drop them at school and have a solid 5-6 hrs to get work done. It's peaceful, and generally, I can be more productive in that time than 8-9 hrs in the office.

The big difference at the moment is that EVERYONE is at home. 6 of us, in a small house. Our house is chaotic at the best of times, so trying to work at the moment is more than a little challenging. 3 school aged kids and me trying to work. Our dinning table is covered with computers and papers and cables running everywhere. Then there's the other daughter pissing and moaning about being poor and needing a job (try asking her to do some jobs around the house without getting the teen attitude), and a wife stressing to the max about money etc, and also not having a job. And if that's not enough, the wife and unemployed daughter are in the 'high risk' category for Corona.

As others have mentioned above, keeping a "separate" space for work and non-work is important. That's really hard to do when we're all confined to such a small space.   

 

 

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22 minutes ago, SomeGuy1977 said:

You're not wrong.

I work at home all the time, maybe a day a week normally. I can sleep in and still get  to work before i would normally if I had to get the train. I have breakfast with the kids, drop them at school and have a solid 5-6 hrs to get work done. It's peaceful, and generally, I can be more productive in that time than 8-9 hrs in the office.

The big difference at the moment is that EVERYONE is at home. 6 of us, in a small house. Our house is chaotic at the best of times, so trying to work at the moment is more than a little challenging. 3 school aged kids and me trying to work. Our dinning table is covered with computers and papers and cables running everywhere. Then there's the other daughter pissing and moaning about being poor and needing a job (try asking her to do some jobs around the house without getting the teen attitude), and a wife stressing to the max about money etc, and also not having a job. And if that's not enough, the wife and unemployed daughter are in the 'high risk' category for Corona.

As others have mentioned above, keeping a "separate" space for work and non-work is important. That's really hard to do when we're all confined to such a small space.   

 

 

:grouphug:

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2 hours ago, Prydzopolis said:

Taking the positives out of things, this is good :) 

Personally I am struggling at home with stay in your home period we are in. I have been practicing social isolation now for about 10 years :lol: but that has been more out of necessity rather than by choice. In fact, if all the times I’ve been stuck at home, not getting out & reducing my activity I’ve found myself get stuck in a vicious circle where doing less breeds more stagnation & getting stuck in that rut which isn’t good for a migraine brain.

Oh well, let’s hope some more positive news :good:

:grouphug:

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3 hours ago, Carns said:

I've worked from home the last 6 years. I can understand the social isolation when you are used to being surrounded by hundreds of people a day. I make a point of talking to my colleagues regularly (both work and non work related) to maintain a connection.

Another thing I do is have separate spaces for my work and living. For me, I set myself up for work in the dining room, and don't spend much time in that space outside of work hours (easier with a laptop rather than a desktop). My partner sets herself up in our office and she does the same. I find it easier to have a dedicated working space that I can leave at the end of the day and not return to/think about.

I do find it difficult at times switching off when I work from home (can respond to emails at all times of the day and night) but I make a point of trying to avoid that outside of business hours (where practical), and definitely don't look at my work phone or open my emails after Friday afternoon until Monday morning.

For me the benefits outweigh any negatives, but you have to take the time to maintain relationships whilst locked at home. I have worked with people who couldn't handle it because they need the social interaction. Which is why I make a point of maintaining connections with people.

All good points Carns!

I didn't  walk into the study at all on Sat - just needed a total break - although mine isn't a job that I've ever been able to (or inclined to) switch off from - but it's just intense this way.

I'm STILL in my PJs. :sad:

That's obviously one modification to make to what I've been doing - get up, shower and dress before turning on the computer!

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13 minutes ago, wendybr said:

That's obviously one modification to make to what I've been doing - get up, shower and dress before turning on the computer!

I've heard of people going for a walk around the block before starting work to have distinct separation between home and work. Might be a bit extreme, but it probably works for some. I've been doing it long enough that I can switch into gear when I have to.

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Wendy, I'd be curious to know how you are keeping in contact with kids from that welfare perspective.

I'm doing what will basically be a weekly google form with my mob (i'm a YA), where they can indicate if they need someone to reach out to them.

Problem is, I can't video chat with them one on one for safety reasons..... not sure what to do about that. It's like, bring a friend to the chat, or do it via email or something, but, it's far from ideal. (happy to chat via messages here if you like)

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Google Classrooms, MS Teams and emails is how I'm in touch.

We're putting up a few questions each day on an International Student Chat Google Classroom, where they are meant to touch base to show they are up and tuned in to their work.

Via those, I'm in touch with all of them each day...one way or another. But it's only about 20 kids!

If we don't hear from them, or if we're concerned, our bilingual aide will call kids, guardians and parents in China. She's beyond helpful, and integral to our ability to stay closely in touch.

And then, class teachers will let me know if they're worried about anyone, or not hearing from any of them. 

No idea how you track 100s of kids as a teacher of 7 or 8 mainstream classes, though.

But with ours (nearly all seniors) they're not here with parents, so I feel quadrupally responsible for making sure they're OK, and are actually working.

Does that make sense?

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Yep, makes sense, ta Wendy.

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Looking over my sons shoulder what has surprised me is how rude some kids are on google classroom, not my son thankfully...he is a couple of teachers favourite, i  can tell :)

Twice now a warning has gone out about the comments getting made and that they will go on report lol I have said to my son that any comment he writes should be considered in the same manner as talking in class.

A couple of kids are gonna get it when they get back from what i have seen :D

Edited by Smoggy

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